Monster Unveils Tool to Find Gold in the ATS Tailings

Mining taling-freeYears ago, when the technology of the day extracted all the gold it was capable of extracting from the tons of earth dug by miners, the remainder was dumped as tailings.

Today, new technology and a historic gold price has made it profitable — immensely so for some operators — to sift through those tailings for the leftover mineral. Reprocessing of a tailings heap in Australia has already yielded $1 billion in gold.

There’s a lesson here for recruiters. Your ATS — or whatever you use — is a gold mine, even though so many treat the resumes of candidates they promised “to keep on file” the way miners once treated tailings. New technology and a tightening demand for skilled workers is now making it more attractive than ever to sift through your candidate database to find the workers with the skills and background you need.

Monster this morning unveiled a Cloud “candidate relationship management” tool to make that sifting far easier and, at a price point starting at $2,000, more cost effective than panning for new candidates.

Explaining Monster’s Cloud CRM is easy enough.

Candidate databases — whether in a commercial ATS or in Excel or even in Outlook — are uploaded to the cloud. You can then search it as you would in an ATS, plugging in the criteria the job req requires, and Monster produces a summary list of all those meeting your needs. It will also search the Monster database listing those candidates.

Monster new CRMFrom there you can send customized email messages to some or all of them, tracking the opens, click-throughs, and responses and creating a file record for each candidate. With more than one job, you can track by campaign.

The difference between using the Monster service and keyword searching your own ATS is that Monster’s patented 6 Sense is a semantic search, meaning it understands from the terms you use what you’re likely looking for — and what you’re not.

In a demo of the new product, Javid Muhammedali, Monster’s VP of product management, searched for a biz dev manager with chemistry as a skill. The search turned up candidates with experience in mass spectrometry because 6 Sense understands that mass spectrometry is an analytical chemistry technique. The typical ATS keyword search would have missed that.

“The differentiation Monster provides is our search capability,” Muhammedali says. Though ATS searching has improved dramatically over the years, most are still keyword based.

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I asked him about the selling points; how would a recruiting lead sell the service, as inexpensive as it may be, in these days of squeaky tight budgets, especially for HR?

He cited the search capability, and the ease of developing, launchin,g and monitoring candidate campaigns via the CRM. These all make a recruiter more efficient, he pointed out, which is double true for agencies and direct employers with rudimentary or no ATS.

I see another selling point. Candidate databases are recruiter gold tailings. Like the physical heaps leftover from the first pass, the candidate database might as well be dead storage. It’s an open secret that recruiters rarely source from their own corporate ATS. In one notable instance, a lead sourcer at Intuit acknowledged having 230 candidates for a director position, yet no one had bothered to look at them.

Why is that? There are plenty of reasons. Two stand out: 1) It can be tedious using standard keyword searches to find just what you want, and; 2) The candidates have been rejected in the past.

Monster’s new CRM service eases that first issue. The second one, makes less sense today, if it ever did, as skilled workers who want to work for you grow ever more in short supply.

As Dr. John Sullivan said, by not mining your database “the corporation is missing out on a great opportunity.”

Image: Liz Noffsinger / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

John Zappe is the editor of TLNT.com and a contributing editor of ERE.net. John was a newspaper reporter and editor until his geek gene lead him to launch his first website in 1994. He developed and managed online newspaper employment sites and sold advertising services to recruiters and employers. Before joining ERE Media in 2006, John was a senior consultant and analyst with Advanced Interactive Media and previously was Vice President of Digital Media for the Los Angeles Newspaper Group.

Besides writing for ERE, John consults with staffing firms and employment agencies, providing content and managing their social media programs. He also works with organizations and businesses to assist with audience development and marketing. In his spare time  he can be found hiking in the California mountains or competing in canine agility and obedience competitions.

You can contact him here.

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6 Comments on “Monster Unveils Tool to Find Gold in the ATS Tailings

    1. Larry, I have no axe to grind in this area. The writer could have easily spoken about the data being stored on a hard drive and hacking can still occur. When you apply, you give permission for a firm to use your data for a variety of purposes including reporting their compliance with government regulations. If you want to sue, go ahead. There’s nothing there.

    2. Larry – I think Jeff’s right, however, it will be interesting to see how many employers are willing to trust Monster with all their resumes… even if it’s in a “private” cloud.

  1. There is a time and place for both semantic and keyword searching techniques. The problem with a hidden search algorithm is the same as a clock that tells the wrong time from time to time- you need to check it against something or you could be missing the true picture.

  2. The weakness in all these screening schemes is their reliance on credentials, which often have no correlation to capability. Research shows that 70-something percent of resumes are “enhanced” in some way. Whether highlighted by standard keyword searches or newer ones such as Monster claims, resumes are little more than unsubstantiated claims that cause companies to spend lots of time and money validating or invalidating them. Also, as is pointed out in the book, “The Rare Find,” those who match well with credential-oriented search criteria tend to be solid performers, but not stars. The stars have what are known as “jagged resumes,” e.g., a few more jobs than you’d like to see, no college degree, or stints at companies that aren’t considered to have the requisite pedigree. Further (unrelated) research shows that credential-based selection processes are rife with staggering amounts of unconscious bias that artificially shrinks an already tight talent pool.

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