Performance and Your Audience – Blogging Tips

As a followup to Dave’s post, I thought I’d post a short article by Chris Brogan (written earlier this year), that provides a few solid tips for blogging.

Whether you call it a forum, a blog, or a journal, it really doesn’t matter. Whether your target audience is the client or candidate makes no difference (although it would certainly make a difference in your topic selection). Bottomline, there are things one can do to better reach that audience, and that’s what Brogan details in this article.

If you have a personal blog, a corporate blog, or just like to point your finger at Dave’s posts, hey, any of these tips will help.

Here’s Brogan:

Performance. When you blog or podcast or record a video, it is an opportunity for a performance, a presentation, a distilled and distinct package of information. It is your chance to connect with your audience and deliver something of value. It is an obligation and a pact.

It’s fine to use these tools for conversation, but consider your audience. Think about how little time they have in a day. Think about the places where they will be spending their time.

Be Brief

Can you say it faster? Do so.

Appeal to Their Sense of Self

Can you tell a story? Will the story help your audience think of themselves? Will your words bring THEIR minds awake?

Be Prepared

It’s not pressure to write good posts. It’s not hell to come up with topics for your podcast. It’s your choice as a producer of good content. Think ahead on that. Keep a notepad file somewhere for ideas when you’re stuck. Record a few extra “evergreen” bits to dispense when you’re not ready.

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Be Respectful

Your audience is brilliant. You sometimes know something they don’t. But treat them like they are masterful and brilliant, and as if you’re just sharing this information, in case they want to brush up. You’re not a god. You’re a communicator.

Be Conversational (and yet Concise)

You can talk as if you’re addressing humans. I write as if you and I are having a conversation. And yet, I try to keep things tight. I don’t fret over it. I practice by posting once or twice a day. You can do the same.

Performance

You’re on a stage. You are creating stories. No matter how you view your blogging and podcasting, that’s what you’re doing. When you cook up that next PowerPoint deck for a meeting, think about that, too. It’s the same thing, sliced differently. There’s no reason to treat it differently.

What are some of your tips and advice? How do you treat your audience? When has it worked best for you?

The Social Media 100 is a project by Chris Brogan dedicated to writing 100 useful blog posts in a row about the tools, techniques, and strategies behind using social media for your business, your organization, or your own personal interests. Swing by [chrisbrogan.com] for more posts in the series, and if you have topic ideas, feel free to share them, as this is a group project, and your opinion matters.

Humble seeker of wireless executives and passionate community-builder behind the curtains of WirelessJobs.com

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2 Comments on “Performance and Your Audience – Blogging Tips

  1. Dennis,

    This is a GREAT post — and you are the man. I especially like your advice to Be Conversational (and yet Concise).

    Gary Halbert, a hero of mine who was widely thought to be the Ted Williams of direct mail, use to coach his copywriting students to “have a ten year old read their copy aloud.” Halbert said that “if the copy sounds stilted and wooden when read by a ten year old — then it’s stilted and wooden.” Right on. It’s gotta be conversational.

    Thanks SO much for the shout out on your blog today. I really appreciate it.

    Kind regards,
    HarryJoiner.com

    PS – Wanna see a magic show? Check out http://www.thegaryhalbertletter.com/Newsletters/zfzs_pearls_of_wisdom.htm

  2. Harry – thank you sir. Wish I could take credit for it (but my stuff is typically stilted and wooden);)

    The greatness of Chris Brogan (you just missed the part where I gave him credit).

    Dennis

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