Prepare Before You Dare!

Every good Recruiter knows that your Internet search is only as good as your understanding of the job responsibilities and requirements of the position. However, we are all guilty of not doing our homework BEFORE we begin the search. We get lazy. Here are some key actions that are needed before we tackle the search or speak to the hiring manager to insure recruiting success:

  1. Know the Key Term Definitions Before Talking with the Hiring Manager – When you receive your requisition it is better to prepare for your conversation with the hiring manager by looking up the terms you are unfamiliar with. Some great places to do this are www.whatis.com, www.onelook.com, or www.techweb.com/encyclopedia. All of these sites not only give complete definitions but also key related terms as well as links to sites that might be excellent sources to search! While reviewing these definitions, jot down similar technologies related to this term. Many times your hiring manager will not only accept the term but also the related technologies which helps to open up your search.

    For instance, your job requisition may require that your candidate know “object oriented programming.” If you simply used “object oriented programming” for your search you would be missing out on a lot of resumes of candidates who are very strong at object oriented programming but did not use that term on their resume. If you go to www.whatis.com you will find that C++ is the most common object oriented programming language while OOP is the acronym associated with this term. Already you have found two other terms to use in order to open up your search and turn over every rock to find a match.

  2. Know the Similar Terms Associated with Your Key Term – Once you have already gathered similar terms from your definition search, you can do some quick term input in any large resume database. This allows you to gather more terms helpful to your search. Find an ideal resume and gather terms like associations, affiliations, degrees, and competitor companies. You should also make note of similar email addresses (ISP’s) when doing a location specific search. This way you can see if the local ISP has a member directory OR X-Ray the ISP when you do your search engine searches.

    For instance, in our search of object-oriented developers we found a strong resume of a candidate who is a member of the Association for Computer Machinery (ACM). By inputting www.ACM.org we are brought to the Association site that also has special interest groups as well as local chapter listings and conference information.

  3. Know Your Competitors – There are several excellent resources on the Internet that can give you this valuable information. I suggest subscribing to Hoovers ($15.00/month) to find excellent competitor, financial as well as key executive information on any organization. Here you can list out the competitors and then use those as key words in your search string or to “flip search” the competitor’s site.

    Armed with a full understanding of the terms in your job requisition, a listing of competitors as well as associations you are now ready to talk with your hiring manager. Not only will your hiring manager be impressed by your knowledge of the position, you will in turn be able to understand to some degree what his/her needs are.

Good luck!

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Audra Slinkey is a leading Internet Recruiting Consultant who has designed the Recruiters-Aid PERS (Proprietary E-Recruitment System) to ensure Internet recruiting success. Recruiters-Aid provides Internet candidate sourcing and screening services, and guarantees results—or the clients do not pay. Recruiters-Aid manages one of the largest FREE recruiting resource sites online. Recruiters-Aid services were created specifically for recruiters who don't have time to source the Internet themselves.

ContactAudra at aslinkey@recruiters-aid.com

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