Why Do Candidates Always Lie to Us?

Lies, Lies, Lies… They’re candidates. They lie!

If you’ve been in the recruiting industry long enough, I’m sure you’ve developed that love-hate relationship with candidates that we know all too well. Understanding a candidate’s motivation for exploring new opportunities or actively seeking a change in employment may be the most difficult part of our job as recruiters. Sure, you catch a break now and then and find that candidate who just got laid-off or who posted their resume on a job board at just the right moment for you to find it. But the industry has shifted, and these days most candidates are passive. For the majority of us out there,   we rely more and more on resources like LinkedIn.

So how do you sift through the lies and get the candidate on your side? By recognizing the “red flags,” and understanding how to turn your candidate into an ally rather than your opponent.

My Favorite Lines

Some of my favorite candidate BS stories are the “I’m not looking to make a change,” and the “Money is not a motivating factor for me.”

First of all, if my candidate isn’t interested in a new job, why are they talking to me? Why are they sitting in their car at 7 p.m. in the parking lot of their son’s soccer game and asking me about the opportunity I have? Money doesn’t motivate them? So why are they telling me they make $80,000 a year at their current job, but market value for someone with their experience and skill set is $65,000? Please, if they’re telling me money doesn’t motivate them, then they probably just don’t have any. People are greedy by nature. The candidates I’ve worked with have proven that time and again.

A couple more of my favorites are: “I’m still working,” and “I’m willing to relocate.” Really, they’re still working? Then why have they called me three times today during work hours, and picked up their phone when they should be at their desk working? Chances are they either got laid-off or fired. They need to own up to it so we can get down to business.

They’re willing to move for the right opportunity? Huh? That’s fine and dandy, unfortunately they failed to mention the fact that their kids are still in school, their wife is employed full-time, and they have a house to sell. I’ve got a better chance of winning the lottery than they do of actually relocating for a job.

Some of the Reasons

So why are candidates lying to you?

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  • They don’t trust you. Most candidates are aware of the fact that you make $$$ when you find them a new job. In their mind I’m sure they’re wondering whether or not you have their best interests at heart, or yours.
  • They see you as the opponent in their negotiations. If they tell you they’re making more $$$ than they actually do, they’ve begun negotiating with you because they believe that you’ll work to get them that salary and you hold the cards.
  • They feel like you’re pushing too hard. ABC (Always Be Closing) doesn’t always work, and nobody wants to feel like they’re being closed by a used car salesperson.
  • They believe their “disinterest” gives them a bargaining chip. “If I appear too eager I’ll seem desperate and get a lesser offer.”
  • They quite simply have something to hide.

At the end of the day if you want your candidates to be honest with you, they need to trust you. They need to know and believe that you have their best interests at heart, and that you aren’t just looking for your next payday.

How do you get them to believe that? By truly having their best interests at heart.

I personally take the time to really understand my candidate’s wants and desires as it pertains to their careers and it’s helped me to build long-lasting, fruitful relationships with many of them that I cherish to this day. The beauty of this industry is that it really can be a win-win-win.

Happy candidate = Happy client = Successful recruiter.

Image: David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Bobby O’Shea is vice president of Belding Partners LLC, a direct placement staffing firm located in Phoenix, AZ. The Phoenix office was founded in 2012 and places engineers and architects throughout the United States. Bobby is a graduate of Minnesota State University, Mankato with a degree in Communication. He lives in Glendale, AZ with his wife and 5 children.

To learn more about Belding Partners and the services they offer please visit their website at www.beldingpartners.net or e-mail Bobby at boshea@beldingpartners.net.

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8 Comments on “Why Do Candidates Always Lie to Us?

  1. I disagree somewhat with the financial talking point. The economy today, and outlook for tomorrow, has shifted my priorities significantly. While money IS a motivator, for me money wasn’t my primary motivator – nor was it a secondary or tertiary either. 1. Organization Stability, 2. Position Longevity, 3. Health Benefits and then 4. Money. Just because this comes in 4th for me, doesn’t mean I don’t have it as then article suggests. With priorities, come shifting motivators. With mine aligned in the above order, I wont deplete my savings on healthcare or looking for another position in 8-12 months.

  2. I disagree somewhat with the financial talking point. The economy today, and outlook for tomorrow, has shifted my priorities significantly. While money IS a motivator, for me money wasn’t my primary motivator – nor was it a secondary or tertiary either. 1. Organization Stability, 2. Position Longevity, 3. Health Benefits and then 4. Money. Just because this comes in 4th for me, doesn’t mean I don’t have it as then article suggests. With priorities, come shifting motivators. With mine aligned in the above order, I wont deplete my savings on healthcare or looking for another position in 8-12 months.

  3. This is too simplistic. When I read an ere article/blog, I’d really like to see solutions to more serious issues than about candidates telling lies that are easily punctured. Not only is everything in this article a rehash of previous conversations and is more suited for the training of newbie recruiters, it does not address examples of lying that are difficult to spot and will have a dramatic impact on the life expectancy of a newly hired professional.

    Example-

    A resume lists bullets that contain metrics. They refer to change that was executed that in one case, resulted in a cost saving of $2.7MM.

    However, what was not included in that bullet was mention of the fact that in getting to that cost saving of $2.7MM, that executive caused waste to occur that measured nearly $750,000 and also caused the loss of several long-term clients.

    References will confirm that $2.7MM but those queried will avoid mentioning the chaos that executive caused that measured out to $750,000 in dollars lost, the resignation of a manager who saw the folly of that executive’s actions/mandates and the loss of those five clients.

    In the interview, the candidate focuses on his achieving that $2.7MM in cost reduction and slants the conversation toward that end result, deliberately omitting reference to the needless expenses he incurred, the loss of a manager who was shouted down and the clients who pulled their business because the process improvement caused them a loss of revenue and eroded at their branding.

    As a result, the executive is hired and it is subsequently discovered he is light on leadership skills and his role as a change agent is over-rated.

    One hundred twenty days later, he is dismissed and the external recruiter is reprimanded and discarded as a vendor, partly because the placement guarantee has expired and the headhunter won’t replace that executive without being paid again.

    Now that’s a blog about candidates who tell lies and is much more deserving of our attention [as a case study] than those silly points listed in Mr. O’Shea’s blog.

  4. This is too simplistic. When I read an ere article/blog, I’d really like to see solutions to more serious issues than about candidates telling lies that are easily punctured. Not only is everything in this article a rehash of previous conversations and is more suited for the training of newbie recruiters, it does not address examples of lying that are difficult to spot and will have a dramatic impact on the life expectancy of a newly hired professional.

    Example-

    A resume lists bullets that contain metrics. They refer to change (PI) that was executed that in one case, resulted in a cost saving of $3.7MM.

    However, what was not included in that bullet was mention of the fact that in getting to that cost saving of $3.7MM, that executive caused waste to occur that measured nearly $1MM and also caused the loss of several long-term clients.

    References will confirm that $3.7MM but those queried will avoid mentioning the chaos that executive caused that measured out to $1MM in dollars lost, the headaches he created with the company’s union including the resignation of a manager who saw the folly of that executive’s actions/mandates and the loss of those five clients.

    In the interview, the candidate focuses on his achieving that $3.7MM in cost reduction and slants the conversation toward that end result, deliberately omitting reference to the needless expenses he incurred, the loss of a manager who was shouted down and the clients who pulled their business because the process improvement caused them a loss of revenue and eroded at their branding.

    As a result, the executive is hired and it is subsequently discovered he is light on leadership skills and his role as a change agent is over-rated.

    One hundred twenty days later, he is dismissed and the external recruiter is reprimanded and discarded as a vendor, partly because the placement guarantee has expired and the headhunter won’t replace that executive without being paid again.

    Now that’s a blog about candidates who tell lies and is much more deserving of our attention [as a case study] than those silly points listed in Mr. O’Shea’s blog.

  5. The article would have been more beneficial if there were some pointers about how to derive the truth from the lies. I have encountered my share of liars in my recruiting career but successful candidates have always been the ones who have been truthful and forthcoming about their experiences and salary expectations.

  6. The article would have been more beneficial if there were some pointers about how to derive the truth from the lies. I have encountered my share of liars in my recruiting career but successful candidates have always been the ones who have been truthful and forthcoming about their experiences and salary expectations.

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